Monday
May 30,2011

Families, corporate teams among those who take stroll through Stanley Park to fight poverty in developing nations

The World Partnership Walk, held under sunny skies in Stanley Park on Sunday, raised more than $2 million to help fight poverty in developing countries, organizers said.

The walk benefits global development projects supported by the Aga Khan Foundation Canada.

What began in Vancouver in 1980 as a fundraiser and celebration of giving for Vancouver’s Ismaili community has become a national event with walks in Toronto and Victoria on the same day, and walks in other Canadian cities later this month.

“What makes the walk unique,” said representative Karim Salemohammed, “is that it is underwritten by the Aga Khan foundation, and 100 per cent of all funds raised goes to projects around the world.”

Walkers, including families and corporate teams, took advantage of the sunny day to walk five kilometres through Stanley Park before joining festivities that included bhangra and other musical performances at Lumbermen’s Arch.

They also had a chance to taste some Ismaili specialties, including sugar cane juice, fresh-cut young coconut, tamarind seeds and traditional barbecue.

The Aga Kahn Foundation Canada is a non-denominational registered charity dedicated to finding solutions to global poverty through grassroots projects focusing on education, sanitation, clean water and rural economic ventures in some of the world’s poorest countries.

“The walk is really all Canadians saying we care about the world. We can do something locally and make a difference globally,” said Salemohammed.

Jameel Dawood, a volunteer at the walk’s global village tent, said what he finds most exciting about working with AKF Canada is the partnership with the Canadian International Development Agency, which meets every dollar raised with a corresponding amount of $8 or $9.

“Just $10 can educate a child in a developing country for a year,” he said.

“Most projects we support start at a grassroots level and use a sandwich approach, bringing research and development and best practices to communities at a grassroots level.”

Funds raised through the annual walk and other Aga Khan Foundation events and partnerships go to communities in countries such as Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Pakistan, Mozambique and Kenya.

Since 1980, the event has raised more than $60 million.

Source: http://www.vancouversun.com/business/World+Partnership+Walk+garners+
more+than+million+world+poor/4859688/story.html#ixzz1NsiTDEUc

Tuesday
Mar 1,2011

Various groups, institutions and individuals have responded positively to government’s request to support the victims of Gongo la Mboto bomb explosions, calling them to donate blood and any other necessities.

His Highness Princes Aga Khan Shia Imami Ismaili Council for Tanzania recently embarked on blood collection from its members for the injured and also distributed needful materials.

Ismaili Community volunteer Alkarim Hirani said the explosions had affected the whole country. It was, therefore, public obligation to support the victims so that the injured could get speedy recovery.

“We have decided to collect blood from our members to save the lives of bomb victims. The blood will be distributed to hospitals, where Bongo la Mboto bomb victims are admitted,” he said.

Hirani also called on other people to donate blood to help nurses and doctors work smoothly when attending to patients in need of blood.

“Doctors and nurses have played a great role in attending the injured people. However, we also need to support them by denoting more blood so that those, who need it get it on time,” he said.

According to him, blood collection was done at Aga Khan Hospital in Dare es Salaam.

Meanwhile, Hirani said the Isamili Community also collected from its members goods worth 4m/-, including blankets, mosquito nets, juice and glucose to support the victims at Saba Saba Grounds, Temeke Hospital and Amana Hospital in Dare es Salaam. He, however, said more support was still needed.

For his part, Muhimbili Public Relations officer Aminiel Aligaesha said volunteers went to the hospital to donate blood for the victims.

He, however, said more blood was needed and he was hopeful that more volunteers would still donate.

Source: The Guardian