Item(s) for the ‘Ismaili News’ Category

Tuesday
Mar 1,2011

Various groups, institutions and individuals have responded positively to government’s request to support the victims of Gongo la Mboto bomb explosions, calling them to donate blood and any other necessities.

His Highness Princes Aga Khan Shia Imami Ismaili Council for Tanzania recently embarked on blood collection from its members for the injured and also distributed needful materials.

Ismaili Community volunteer Alkarim Hirani said the explosions had affected the whole country. It was, therefore, public obligation to support the victims so that the injured could get speedy recovery.

“We have decided to collect blood from our members to save the lives of bomb victims. The blood will be distributed to hospitals, where Bongo la Mboto bomb victims are admitted,” he said.

Hirani also called on other people to donate blood to help nurses and doctors work smoothly when attending to patients in need of blood.

“Doctors and nurses have played a great role in attending the injured people. However, we also need to support them by denoting more blood so that those, who need it get it on time,” he said.

According to him, blood collection was done at Aga Khan Hospital in Dare es Salaam.

Meanwhile, Hirani said the Isamili Community also collected from its members goods worth 4m/-, including blankets, mosquito nets, juice and glucose to support the victims at Saba Saba Grounds, Temeke Hospital and Amana Hospital in Dare es Salaam. He, however, said more support was still needed.

For his part, Muhimbili Public Relations officer Aminiel Aligaesha said volunteers went to the hospital to donate blood for the victims.

He, however, said more blood was needed and he was hopeful that more volunteers would still donate.

Source: The Guardian

Wednesday
Dec 15,2010

Prince Karim Aga Khan is the spiritual leader of about 20 million Shia Imami Ismaili Muslims and is now turning 74.  He was born on December 13, 1936 in Switzerland. Every year on December 13, the Ismailies around the world celebrate his birthday with religious and emotive zeal.

The Murids arrange religious Majalises in Jamat Khanas where they make religious offerings, supplications and reaffirm their allegiance to the Imam of time. Sweets and festive refreshment is served and the Ismailies wish each other Khushhali or Salgira Mubarak.

Ismailies around the world celebrated the Salgira, this year, jubilantly. Jamat Khanas were decorated in many parts of the world. Many people in North America, Australia and Europe closed their offices and businesses early to get to Jamat Khanas in time.

In Gilgit-Baltistan and Chitral of Pakistan, Ismailies also congregated the Birthday of their Imam in a festive and religious fashion. Houses were seen decorated, lighting on the mountains and around Jamat Khana (prayer and social hall) premises and cultural dishes were especially prepared in the designated area of Jamat Khana called Langer.

Various Day and evening Majalises were arranged in which waezeen delivered speeches urging the Murids to follow the guidance of their Imam in their worldly and religious matters. The waezeen emphasized the Jamat to work for the better image of Islam through service to humanity.

This year’s celebrations were congregated modestly as the Ismailies simultaneously honour the holy month of Muharam in which one of their Imams, Imam Hussain Ibn Ali was martyred and his family was massacred by Umayyad Caliph Yazid, at Karbala in 680 CE

They pledged that every member of the community will continue to serve the humanity which, their Imam has consistently taken as mission since 1957.

The Ismailies concluded their celebrations with special prayers for all the Muslims around the world who are passing through difficult times. They also prayed for their national prosperity, peace and development in all their respective countries.

Q.K Sunny from Gilgit-Baltistan has contributed to this story

Monday
Nov 1,2010

As societies come to think in pluralistic ways, I believe they can learn another lesson from the Canadian experience, the importance of resisting both assimilation and homogenization — the subordination and dilution of minority cultures on the one hand, or an attempt to create some new, transcendent blend of identities on the other.

What the Canadian experience suggests to me is that identity itself can be pluralistic. Honouring one’s own identity need not mean rejecting others. One can embrace an ethnic or religious heritage, while also sharing a sense of national or regional pride. To cite a timely example, I believe one can live creatively and purposefully as both a devoted Muslim and a committed European.

I believe that the challenge of pluralism is never completely met. Pluralism is a process and not a product. It is a mentality, a way of looking at a diverse and changing world.

A pluralistic environment is a kaleidoscope that history shakes every day.

Responding to pluralism is an exercise in constant re-adaptation. Identities are not fixed in stone. What we imagine our communities to be must also evolve with the tides of history.

As we think about pluralism, we should be open to the fact that there may be a variety of “best practices,” a “diversity of diversities,” and a “pluralism of pluralisms.”

In sum, what we must seek and share is what I have called “a cosmopolitan ethic,” a readiness to accept the complexity of human society. It is an ethic which balances rights and duties. It is an ethic for all peoples.

It will not surprise you to have me say that such an ethic can grow with enormous power out of the spiritual dimensions of our lives. In acknowledging the immensity of The Divine, we will also come to acknowledge our human limitations, the incomplete nature of human understanding.

In that light, the amazing diversity of creation itself can be seen as a great gift to us — not a cause for anxiety but a source of delight. Even the diversity of our religious interpretations can be greeted as something to share with one another — rather than something to fear.

In this spirit of humility and hospitality, the stranger will be welcomed and respected, rather than subdued — or ignored.

In the holy Koran we read these words: “O mankind! Be careful of your duty to your Lord Who created you from a single soul … [and] joined your hearts in love, so that by His grace ye became brethren.”

As we strive for this ideal, we will recognize that “the other” is both “present” and “different.” And we will be able to appreciate this presence — and this difference — as gifts that can enrich our lives.

Let me conclude by emphasizing once again the urgency of this challenge. We are at a particularly complex moment in human history. The challenges of diversity are frightening for many people, in societies all around the world. But diversity also has the capacity to inspire.

The mission of the Global Centre for Pluralism is to look closely at these challenges — and to think hard about them. This will be demanding work. But as we go forward, we hope we can discern more predictably and pre-empt more effectively those conditions which lead to conflict among peoples. And we also hope that we can advance those institutions and those mindsets which foster constructive engagement.

The world we seek is not a world where difference is erased, but where difference can be a powerful force for good, helping us to fashion a new sense of cooperation and coherence in our world, and to build together a better life for all.

The Aga Khan, the 49th Hereditary Imam (spiritual leader) of the Shia Ismaili Muslims, delivered the prestigious 10th Annual LaFontaine-Baldwin Lecture in Toronto, at the invitation of the Institute for Canadian Citizenship. This is an excerpt from that speech.

Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/opinion/Diversity+force+good+world/3709850/story.html#ixzz142Z2hVvL